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4 edition of Interval velocities from seismic reflection time measurements found in the catalog.

Interval velocities from seismic reflection time measurements

Peter Hubral

Interval velocities from seismic reflection time measurements

by Peter Hubral

  • 48 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Society of Exploration Geophysicists in Tulsa, Okla .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Seismic reflection method.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Peter Hubral and Theodor Krey ; edited by Kenneth L. Larner.
    ContributionsKrey, Theodor., Larner, Kenneth L.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsTN269 .H89 1980
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxi, 203 p. :
    Number of Pages203
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4117628M
    ISBN 100931830133
    LC Control Number80050915

    This paper described the challenge in developing and testing a fully automated routine for measuring interval velocities from multi-channel seismic data. Various approaches are employed for generating an interactive algorithm picking interval velocity for continuous normal moveout (NMO) corrected gather and replacing the interpreter's effort for manual picking the coherent reflections. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods have been described by Sain & Kaila (), who proposed a method of directly calculating interval velocities and layer thickness from a series of wide-angle reflection times from various subsurface interfaces. Since all of these methods are based on the layer stripping technique, errors in the.

      ELSEVIER Journal of Applied Geophysics 35 () 1 - 13 LIEI I EIJFII 51C5 Reflection tomography versus stacking velocity analysis Gualtiero Boehm *, Jos~ M. Carcione, Aldo Vesnaver Osserz'atorio Geofisico Sperimentale, P. , Trieste, Italy Received 6 March ; accepted 5 September Abstract The travel-time inversion of reflected arrivals reconstructs the . Such derivatives are expected to be useful for processes dealing with the problem of estimating velocities for depth migration of seismic data. The subject of the paper is a particular aspect of ray perturbation theory, where observed parameters—two-way reflection time and horizontal components of slowness, are constraining the ray path when.

    The seismic cone penetration test (SCPT) has proven to be a very valuable geotechnical tool in facilitating the determination of low strain (velocities. The P- and S-wave velocities are directly related to the soil elastic constants of Poisson's ratio, shear modulus, bulk modulus, and Young's modulus. Seismic data themselves provide velocity information through measurement of normal moveout (NMO). If a seismic reflection is recorded from a horizontal reflector, and the earth above the reflector (the overburden) has a uniform P-wave velocity V, the traveltime T(x) for a source-receiver separation of x is given by the hyperbolic equation.


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Interval velocities from seismic reflection time measurements by Peter Hubral Download PDF EPUB FB2

Buy Interval Velocities Form Seismic Reflection Time Measurements on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders Interval Velocities Form Seismic Reflection Time Measurements: Hubral, Peter, Krey, Theodor, Larner, Kenneth L.: : BooksCited by: Interval velocities from seismic reflection time measurements.

Tulsa, Okla.: Society of Exploration Geophysicists, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Peter Hubral; Theodor Krey; Kenneth L Larner. So long as layers are nearly planar and horizontal, and subsurface velocities tend to increase with depth, CDP reflection time curves for multiples will be more curved than those of primaries having the same two-way zero-offset times.

The CDP stacking process can be studied from both a signal- and ray-theoretical point of view. In computing. larger distances by seismic reflection profiles, the sonic measurements were scaled in slowness and converted to P wave interval velocities: Vk m ¼ 1= Xn 2 i¼n 1 t s=ðÞn 2 n 1; ð1Þ where V m k is the mean P wave velocity (average velocity) of the interval k, defined by n 1 and 2, and t s are the instantaneous measurements in the interval Cited by: For instance the reflection or diffraction time curves used for normal moveout corrections must be hyperbolae.

in K. Larner (ed.), ‘Interval Velocities from Seismic Reflection Time Measurements’, Society of Exploration Geophysicists, pp. – CrossRef eBook Packages Springer Book Archive; Buy this book on publisher's Author: Dan Loewenthal, Theodor Krey. His concise book Interval Velocities from Seismic Reflection Time Measurements, co-authored by Theodor Krey, is still an obligatory reference for anyone engaged in seismic exploration geophysics.

The basic principle of the seismic reflection technique application is to measure the time taken for a seismic wave that travels from a source down into the ground where it is reflected back to the surface where it can be detected by a receiver (geophone): The measured time is known as the two way time.

Reflection traveltime tomography is based on perturbing the initial model parameters by a small amount and then matching the change in traveltimes to the traveltime measurements made from residual moveout analysis of image gathers.A mathematical treatment of the subject is given in Section JHere, we remind ourselves of the underlying assumptions, outline the theory, and examine the.

A sonic log represents direct measurement of the velocity with which seismic waves travel in the earth as a function of depth. Seismic data, on the other hand, provide an indirect measurement of velocity. Based on these two types of information, the exploration seismologist derives a large number of different types of velocity — interval, apparent, average, root-mean-square (rms.

Seismic measurements of velocity are averaged over the horizontal distance through which the seismic energy travels. Sediment velocities generally increase with depth due to increased pressure of the overburden. Fluids within pores tend to make the rocks less compressible and lead to higher interval velocities for P-waves.

Seismic wave velocities increase with depth in the continental crust from to km/s at depths of. Lower crustal velocities range from to km/s, and in some cases show a bimodal distribution. An analysis of stacking, rms, average and interval velocity over a horizontally layered ground, Seismic velocities from surface measurements, Interval Velocities from Seismic Reflection Time Measurement, SEG, Tulsa.

Google Scholar. In reflection surveys and velocity analysis, calculations of interval velocities and layer-thicknesses of a multilayered horizontal structure are often based on Dix's equation which requires the travel times at zero offsets and a prior estimate of the root mean squared velocities.

In this paper a method is presented which requires only the reflection travel-time data. Reflection seismic data measure the traveltime of a seismic pulse from its source to subsurface reflectors and back to a receiver or array of receivers.

A complete description of geology requires that any interpretation derived from these data, recorded in the time domain, be placed accurately in the 3D depth domain, and you use velocity.

Geophysical books Interval Velocities Form Seismic Reflection Time Measurements () Transient Waves in Layered Media (Methods in Geochemistry and Geophysics) () Elastic Waves in Random Media: Fundamentals of Seismic Stratigraphic Filtering (Lecture Notes in Earth Sciences) ().

Hubral, P., and Krey, T.,Interval Velocities from Seismic Reflection Time Measurements (The Society of Exploration Geophysicists Monograph, Tulsa ). Google Scholar Kaila, K. L., and Krishna, V. (), A New Computerized Method for Finding Effective Velocity from Reversed Reflection Travel Time Data, Geophys.

44, –   Hubral P and Krey T Interval Velocities from Seismic Reflection Time Measurements (Tulsa, OK: Society of Exploration Geophysists) Crossref Osher S and Sethian J A Front propagating with curvature dependent speed: algorithms based on Hamilton-Jacobi formulations J.

where − and are the stacking velocities from the datum to reflectors above and below the layer and − and are reflection arrival times. This formula is often misused to calculate interval velocities in situations that do not satisfy Dix's assumptions.

The time required for the seismic signal to travel from its source to a reflector and back is known as the two-way travel time, and it is measured in milliseconds (ms) (equal to 1 x seconds). The Fathometer calculates the depth to a water bottom by dividing the two-way travel time by two and multiplying the result by the velocity of sound.

The purpose of this paper is to discuss field and interpretive techniques which permit, in favorable cases, the quite accurate determination of seismic interval velocities prior to drilling. A simple but accurate formula is developed for the quick calculation of interval velocities from "average velocities" determined by the known x 2-T 2.

interval velocity using the second derivative of the CDP time arrivals. We consider the last layer to be horizontal, Fig. 1 and use the following notations: t 1(ξ) is one-way time from the zero-offset reflection point to the top of this layer.

τ(ξ,x) is one-way time along the same ray time from the top of the layer to the measurement surface. The interval velocity, vint, the velocity between two sequential reflections, has been a major aim in VA, because it is directly related to geological formations, rock properties, stacks, and migration, as described by Buland et al.

()) and, classically, by Claerbout () and Gazdag and Sguazzerro ().This short book is for students, professors and professionals interested in signal processing of seismic data using MATLAB. The step-by-step demo of the full reflection seismic data processing.